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The expectation of privacy in America

18 Feb

I was eating dinner with my best friend a few nights ago, and somehow the topic of privacy came up. I can’t remember how or why we started talking about it, but the conversation itself was interesting, and as she has no experience or education in journalism, advertising or marketing, some of the things I said to her shocked her.

I think what got us truly started on the topic was when we started to discuss the “right to be forgotten” laws in Germany. For anyone who doesn’t know, this law basically says that you have the right not to be included in web searches, and to be erased from the internet if you want to be. Since it passed, people in Germany, and across the EU, have been suing Google to have themselves removed from web searches. We then started to compare foreign privacy laws to those of the United States.

It really should come as no shock that there is no expectation of privacy in this country. Everything you do – every purchase, every mouse click, every social media account – is monitored, and the data is stored and used to understand how you, the consumer, thinks and acts, and hopefully predict your next purchase or vote. Every piece of data is of value to someone. But it doesn’t end there.

In the United States revenge porn is legal, despite it being morally despicable. The only state so far to even touch the issue is California.

The point is there is a difference between the information we offer willingly, and those we don’t. That is why I’m confused when I hear industry professionals talking about balancing big data with privacy concerns. They aren’t taking any information that wasn’t willingly given. The information and the data is there to be collected, analyzed, understood and translated into something actionable – because of that shoe purchase on Zappos, or that restaurant review on Yelp, or any other myriad of things that you did online.

Basically what it comes down to is this: there is no privacy in America anymore. I’m not saying it’s a bad thing (I’m not saying it’s a good thing either). In fact, I’m quite indifferent on the matter.

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Learning from failure: Running a social media campaign Part 2

16 Apr

This year, I set out with a goal. It was quite simple really. All I wanted to do was raise money for the Special Olympics of North Carolina as part of the Duke MBA Games (and raise more than we did last year).  I thought that by using social media, I could raise awareness, and ignite passion in my followers to inspire them to donate to my cause.  I created a special Twitter handle and Facebook page for my MBA’s fundraising team to centralize our messages.  I thought, after doing all that, my teammates would assist in my efforts to raise awareness via social.  Perhaps it was a combination of my teammates lack of enthusiasm, or low interest in Special Olympics on social, I can’t be sure, but my campaign never really took off.

Before heading into this venture, I knew how to utilize twitter and implement hashtags, I knew that I should mention people that were influential in the cause (IE Special Olympics, Special Olympics of North Carolina), and influencers on campus (Syracuse University).  Some of my posts got good responses, but for the most part, there were only a handful of  people that interacted with the posts on a regular basis (including myself).  I rarely got responses from the university, or the Whitman school, even though I constantly mentioned them in my tweets. More often, I got interactions from the Special Olympics of North Carolina or Duke MBA Games.  Below are some key highlights.

april 11 tweet april 3 tweets march 19 tweet April 7 tweet april 1 tweet

In terms of Facebook, the key was getting people to like the page.  I thought that my classmates, especially those who were on the team in the past, would immediately like the page.  I was surprised to learn that very few of them took the effort to click “like”, even though it was such a simple thing.  Although many more of my interactions took place on Facebook, I thought they would reach a larger audience, with more people sharing, liking and commenting on my posts.

I had high hopes when starting.  I believed in the power of social media, and thought that I could use it to reach out to others who believed in this cause and encourage them to donate.  Perhaps, due to my naivete, I wasn’t fully prepared to handle what I was trying to do.  I also believed my school and teammates would be more involved in the effort, and would help try to spread the word on social.  Keeping people updated on what we are doing and our fundraising progress is what I would think people would what to see when donating to a cause.

Key learnings:

  • Have a plan, before starting on social
  • Reach out to key influencers to amplify message – create digital street team
  • Post multiple times a day, on multiple platforms, to remain top of mind – people don’t always see the post the first time
  • Create a campaign, not just messages, to create support

Although I essentially “failed” at running my first social cause campaign, I have learned what ‘not to do’.  In many ways, I believe that is just as – or more important – than running a successful campaign.  When doing something wrong, the lessons stick with you more, because you don’t want to fail again.  When you succeed, although you want to succeed again, you don’t know what it feels like to fail.  In a way, this might be the bigger win, and I’m glad it happened.

What exactly does ‘Global Innovation Management’ mean? A look back at a week in Seoul

1 Apr

For spring break I went to Seoul, South Korea to study “Global Innovation Management”.  Before going, I wasn’t sure what to expect, but after my trip, I think I have a good understanding of what global innovation means.

We spent the week going to companies like Korea Telecom, Amore Pacific, and YG Entertainment, as well as Hyundai, LG Display, and Samsung. I learned a lot about the challenges that global brands face when targeting multiple countries, and how they have to alter their marketing message (perhaps even their brand image) to match the values of that country.

Amore Pacific

Amore Pacific, a Korean cosmetics company, operates in multiple countries, including Japan, China, France, and the United States.  Marketing in each country is not a one-size-fits-all strategy.  As the company has learned, each country has different needs, and is more likely to be open to different products.  In Korea, Amore Pacific offers all their products and product lines.  When expanding to different countries, they have to understand the limitations of what they can offer in each.  In order to understand this, they conduct market research, surveys, and other types of research before launching any new product in a new market.

Welcome to Samsung

While in Seoul, my class just happened to visit Samsung the day before the Galaxy S4 launch.  Besides the fact that this was enormously historic, we were able to see how Samsung views itself in the global marketplace.  In most countries, Samsung is the number one in the mobile phone market.  The exception, of course, is the United States, where number one is Apple.  Additionally, the company shared with us other ways in which they market themselves, including experience stores.  In addition to getting a tour of Samsung Digital City, we also got a tour of the Samsung offices, and were able to see the history of what is now one of the largest technology companies in the world.  Seeing where the company started, and where it is now was one of the most enlightening experiences of the trip.

Welcome to Korea Telecom

Korea Telecom, one of the three main telecom companies in Korea, mainly functions within Korea.  However, they are ranked 5th in global markets in mobile smartphone usage.  In addition to providing mobile communications networks, they do work on other additional projects that reach outside of Korea and into the rest of Asia.  Some of their projects include a K-pop music app that is very iTunes like, and could possibly be a strong competitor in the Asian market.  Some others are education technologies that would take learning into the digital age.

Being able to go to a country that I most likely would never have visited of my own volition was amazing.  Being able to see how these companies view themselves versus how we in the United States view them was truly educational.  Additionally, being exposed to Korean culture was, most likely, a once in a lifetime opportunity.  Although I’m not exactly sure what “Global Innovation Management” means, I am inspired by what I saw and learned during my trip, and I understand that global brands have a multitude of challenges facing them when serving the global market.  There is no one-size-fits-all solution.

Social media and higher ed at Syracuse University

28 Feb
  1. .@Just_Kate, Syracuse native, talks to use about her background. She started @SyracuseU in Aug of 2011! #Newhousesm6
  2. After business school, a tech start up in Boston, Kate came back to Syracuse to head up the school’s social media.
  3. .@SyracuseU, as a university, follows a “best practices” policy for #SoMe, doesn’t necessarily have rules #newhousesm6
  4. 8 students work on SU’s SM accounts under the guidance of @Just_Kate, empowered to handle crisis situations! Cool! #newhousesm6
  5. Kate built a model in which students essentially run the social media accounts.  In crisis situations, students have the option to step off, but they are encouraged to stay on and are empowered with PR skills.  The only exception: campus safety. In those situations, Kate takes over and works directly with the appropriate department.
  6. The idea @Just_Kate says it’s about the student perspective as well as administration #NewhouseSM6 http://pic.twitter.com/GKenje3Rdn
  7. Social media in higher ed is about what your students what to talk about just as much as what the institution wants.  Both perspectives are necessary.
  8. Your social media team should go through extensive training before even touching the SM accounts via @Just_Kate #NewhouseSM6
  9. The social media team at Syracuse goes through training before ever touching a University account.  This includes tone of voice, and how to respond to users.
  10. To keep and nurture your audience, you need to create valuable content via @Just_Kate #NewhouseSM6
  11. “We RARELY put up anything on our FB that doesn’t have a visual element to pull the viewer in” says @just_kate #NewhouseSM6
  12. Kate defines “value” as visuals (photos, video) or linking to external sites.
  13. ROI = return on investment. In social, it’s difficult to measure. Kate measures it in Alumni donations, responses to individual posts, etc.
  14. Talking @Foursquare and @SyracuseU now – @just_kate in #NewhouseSM6 http://twitpic.com/c7kt7y
  15. Syracuse is on Twitter and Facebook, but also on Google , Foursquare, Pinterest, and Instagram.  That’s a lot to manage, but her model has it well covered.
  16. We hear @Just_Kate is dropping some knowledge on @DR4WARD‘s class, #NewhouseSM6. Take some notes, kids. She’s knows her stuff.
  17. Best branding techniques = Don’t be too obvious with content. Subtly goes a long way via @Just_Kate #NewhouseSM6
  18. have a plan, and plan your content BEFORE getting on #SoMe says @Just_Kate #newhousesm6
  19. Kate’s words of advice: always have a plan. Social media takes time, and takes content. Lacking in either will make your social campaign suffer.

What do you do with a Masters in New Media Management?

9 Feb

i gots a degree

As of December 2012, I have officially completed all the requirements for the Masters of Science degree in New Media Management.  With graduation only three months away, and one masters degree completed, I am thinking about what I want to do afterwards.  Many of my projects and outside work this past year have focused on Project Management, Community Management, and Market Research.

Although I’m debating between Social TV and Sports Social Media Marketing, I believe both areas of social media are innovative, and have a lot to offer.  Both TV fanatics and avid sports fans want to be connected all the time to their favorite show or team, and always want more information (whether its from the actors or the athletes).  I can see myself in either area, as both are fast paced, and are constantly pushing new boundaries.  No matter what I do, I want to be continually challenged in my career.

Applicable Skills:

Social Media networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Instagram, Foursquare, WordPress, and Linkedin, as well as others

Knowledge of Analytics sites such as ComScore, Wildfire, Google Adwords, Google Trends and Google Analytics

Social Media Strategy

Account Management

Community Management

For more info, please see my resume, visit my Linkedin page, or contact me

What I learned running a Social Media campaign, Part One

16 Jan

team whitmanThis year I created, and managed, the social media platforms for the fundraising efforts of the Whitman Team for the Duke MBA Games. I believed that utilizing the power of Social Media would amplify our message, and would help our team gain more donations from outside the Whitman and Syracuse community. This experience has taught me more than any classroom exercise.

I started my efforts by writing an email to the school’s daily newspaper, The Daily Orange, telling them of our efforts, and of the launch of our social media platforms. Additionally, every tweet mentioned Syracuse University or the Whitman School, and all used the hashtag Special Olympics or DukeMBAGames. My goal was that anyone who followed that hashtag (mostly the Special Olympics, or any of the state Special Olympic boards), would see the tweets, and start following our handle, and retweet us.

I didn’t realize how difficult it was to gain followers if you aren’t a known business or cause. Additionally, without the assistance of the school paper or other news outlets on campus publicizing our efforts, most of the school community never knew of our efforts, either this year or last year. Even worse, we won last years games, and the majority of the campus never knew.

dec 4 tweetOur first fundraising event of the year was a ’70s themed ice skating event at the Syracuse University Ice Rink. In addition to making flyers, which were put up around campus, I advertised and reached out through social media. Using both the Whitman Duke Games Twitter account, and my personal account, I tweeted at the University, the Special Olympics of North Carolina, Newhouse, and other Syracuse accounts, using the hashtags #DukeMBAGames and/or #SpecialOlympics. By using these hashtags, my goal was that other universities would start to use them, and by the Duke MBA Games, one of them would trend. The ice skating event raised over $200, which we were very pleased about.

Jan 5 Syracue

After the ice skating event, I continued to reach out to the University to through social media, promoting our fundraising activities, the Duke MBA Games, and our donation page. In early January, the Syracuse University Twitter handle didn’t just retweet, but tweeted about the Duke Games (of course after I had tweeted at them).

I am still managing both the Twitter and Facebook pages for the Whitman Team, and will be until the Duke MBA Games in April. As I continue through the rest of the year, I am optimistic that we will gain a larger social media presence, which will increase our fundraising efforts. Additionally, as I continue through this process, I am sure I will continue to fail and I learn what doesn’t work, but I am sure I will succeed as well as I learn what does.

WHITMAN TEAM – DUKE MBA GAMES
Syracuse, NY, November 2012 – April 2013
Social Media/Community Manager: Syracuse University’s team to raise money for the Special Olympics of North Carolina. Created and managed the Twitter and Facebook pages for the Whitman team. From the social media pages, created awareness throughout the Syracuse University community.

Award-winning pages from The Miami Hurricane

5 Jan

Below are samples of my work that won awards during my tenure at The Miami Hurricane.

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